Edmonds loves fish! Just witness the fishermen and crabbers who line the pier, poles in hand. Luckily, Edmonds also has a hoppin’ restaurant scene and fish is on the the menu. Quality Poke, sushi and oysters are just the beginning.

Many local restaurants will sell fish and chips, including the waterfront restaurants, Spud Fish and Chips, Arnie’s Restaurant and Bar, and Anthony's Homeport Edmonds and Anthony’s Beach Cafe, where they serve Mahi Mahi tacos, coconut shrimps, and fettuccine with clams. Fresh oysters and quintessential Pacific Northwest seafood fare are in many of the local restaurants, including Salt & Iron and Bar Dojo, an upscale restaurant fusing modern asian cuisine with Northwest flare.

But if you want a restaurant or market dedicated to fish, then Edmonds has so much in store for you. 

The Mar·ket Fishmonger and Eatery 

The location’s name is a play on words, as “mar” is Spanish for “sea.” The fare is decidedly multicultural and a top notch addition to the quality of culinary options in Edmonds. The restauranteurs wanted to give people the kind of foodie experience they would expect in Seattle. Locally popular are their fish tacos and lobster rolls, as well as seafood by the pound, including sea bass, king salmon, sturgeon, albacore tuna, Pacific cod, ahi tuna, steelhead, and Maine lobster, some of which they’re happy to cook for you. They’re even providing $5 school lunches to go!

Kuzma's Fish Market 

The immigration of Croations to the Pacific Northwest brought fishermen from Anacortes to Everett. Ken Hewitt brings the fish processing skills he learned from his Croation grandmother, and the extensive experience of an Asian fishmonger to Kuzma’s Fish Market. Hewitt’s grandmother ran the famed West Seattle fish market, where he worked with her. He later joined Mutual Fish Co., which, he said, was like getting a college degree in fishmongering. Hewitt then ran the Uwajimaya fish market in Seattle for nearly two decades. He brings a wealth of knowledge and will gladly share it — either one recipe at a time, or in tips in how to process or cook the catch you find at his market. He also offers a take-out menu with fresh ahi Poke bowls. Come for lunch and go home with your dinner ready to cook.

99 Ranch Market

This is like going to the seafood market in Chinatown, with tanks full of live fish and crabs. Everything you could possibly want in the way of fish you can probably find at Ranch 99. The Asian grocery story is brim full of produce and pantry items to complete your meal, and they’ll fry fish you at the counter, or you can visit their deli for a meal while you’re there.

The market is easily accessible on Highway 99 and in Edmonds’ International District. There are a bevy of quality Asian restaurants in the area — so check it out if you’re hungry for a fish meal of any kind. Start by exploring the International District on Highway 99.  Eater Magazine of Seattle featured the 12 Essential Asian Restaurants of Edmonds, all but one of them on Highway 99.

Ono Poke

Ono Poke, named for its Hawaiian native owner Steven Ono, serves authentic Hawaiian Poke. With a focus on sustainable and fresh, their Ahi tuna comes in daily from the Honolulu Fish Auction. They only use fresh sushi grade 1 Bigeye or Yellowfin tuna. Every detail is curated for the quintessential Poke experience, including seaweed salad and Tako from the Toyosu Fish Market in Japan, Hawaiian Kukui nuts, Boston scallops, Japanese Seaweed Salad, British Columbian Salmon — all fresh and sushi grade 1. Even the vegetable options are organic.

Sankai Sushi

Featured in Seattle Eater Magazine,  Sankai Sushi is elevating the Edmonds' foodie experience even higher. Ryuichi Nakano ran one of Seattle's favorite sushi spots, Kisaku -- disappointing his loyal patrons when he sold. An opportunity to open in Edmonds resulted in Sankai. The menu is extensive, including nigiri, rolls, tempura dishes, and Omakase experiences. "Omakase" means to entrust yourself to the chef -- opening up an opportunity to try new things.